Nina_Iris_table
Name: Nina_Iris_table
Description: Iris Corbett and Nina Goldthorpe
Collection: 1948 Olympics: Then & Now
Location:
Reference:
Contributor: Shari Baker ©2012 | www.floemedia.co.uk
Rights: Shari Baker ©2012 | www.floemedia.co.uk
Iris was married in 1950 and it wasn’t until two years later in 1952 that rationing stopped. For your weekly ration shop, you had the coupons either marked off of cut out by the shopkeeper. The shopkeepers would then save these coupons, count them into hundreds every fourth Sunday and send them off to get this allocation back. Iris knows this process only too well as she used to do this for her father, who was a grocer.

There were different categories of ration coupons. ABC coupons were tinned goods, such as fruit or salmon. Depending on the quality of the food, more points would need to be spent. An ‘A’ tin was 1 point, a ‘B’ tin was 2 points and a ‘C’ tin was 3 points. People spent their meat rations at the local butchers and would save up their coupons to have a nice Christmas dinner. If you were lucky, you could get quarter of a pound of liver.

 When Iris was married, she was earning about £5 a week, the same as her husband who had finished a six-year apprenticeship and had gone onto a man’s wage. To supplement their earnings, Iris and her family were members of the Co-op. Each time they shopped there, they would collect a book of little cheques and twice a year would get an amount of money (or ‘dividend’) according to how much they had spent. People, especially families, would rely on this money and wait for the payment to come around again.


Download video

Get Adobe Flash here

Name: Iris_Corbett_MP4
Description: Video interview with Iris Corbett
Collection: 1948 Olympics: Then & Now
Location:
Reference:
Contributor: Leeds City Council Older People's Sport Development
Rights: Leeds City Council Older People's Sport Development