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Cllr. Joyce Sanders tells us about her early life and how she got into working in the mills. Cllr. Wenda Whitehead talks about the tight knit community.

Clip one: Joyce tells us about her early life and how she got into working in the mills. At 13 she trained in short hand and typing at Pitman College. By 15 she had a choice of where she could work. She chose Britannia mills so she could not only work behind the desk but with others in the mill. She says the atmosphere was fantastic. She tells us how there was a mill on every street and everyone got along with each other. Her husband Ken Sanders, was a textile designer and later a manager in a different mill. Whilst walking down Queen Street in present day they meet retired weavers and spinners, who say “Ken, if you were to open a mill today we would be there.”

Clip two: Cllr. Whitehead talks about the tight knit community. Where people would only be selected to work in the mill if they were in contact with the owner for example went to the same church. The unions became proactive, there were no shareholders. The mill owners were rich and the workers were poor. However, the mill owners built schools and provided education for the children of the mill workers. A typical day of a 10 year old would be: school in the morning and working in the mills in the afternoon.